Artifacts
 

 
Autumnal Anxiety
Linda's Corner
Student Snapshot
Mars Millennium
Art History
Art Quiz & Try This
Odyssey on the Move
Art on the Internet
Odyssey Interactive
Worth a Look
Congratulations
Miscellaneous

Vol II Issue 2


AUTUMNAL ANXIETY
Most people are uncomfortable with uncertainty. As we approach a new season, new classes, new experiences, we all feel a sense of unsureness. It is so much easier to know what will happen at an event before it occurs. The Mona Lisa's smile suggests, however, that ambiguity may be fascinating. Reality is very complex. Life is, fortunatley or unfortunately, not black and white.

Studies have shown that creative people are more able than most to live with uncertainty. Think of the scientist trying to discover a cure to a disease. The experimental phase probably takes up most of his time. A world renowned scientist recently said that the cure for MS may well happen by accident. It is the ability to allow the uncertain phase of life to occur that often leads to the most rewarding events.

How can we translate the above into our own lives? Try new techniques, experiment and constantly test things. Try using the words "could" and "possibly" more. Eliminate words like "never," "always" and other absolutes and experiment with speculation in your thinking. "I wonder. . ." is a good start.

 

LINDA'S CORNER
An article in the July 26, 1999 issue of Forbes Magazine wrote about how test scores increased dramatically at schools which implement a "core knowledge" curriculum. The curriculum was developed by University of Virginia professor E. Donald Hirsch, who wrote in his best selling book that there is a common body of knowledge that all American kids should be familiar with. He actually developed an outline of 5,000 facts that are essential to the education of our children. Famous works of art are, of course, included in his list. The theory is, the more you know, the more you are able to learn.

Odyssey Art classes take this one step further. Our programs for children distill important facts from the civilzations we base our yearly programs on and present children with no only visual artowkr from the great museums but also the reasons why the works were created. Our adult classes, while not structured the same way, are often based upon art styles, methods, and even the work of famous artists everyone should be familiar with. An Odyssey Art Center instructor may base her painting lesson on a current show at one of the museums. An Odyssey Art at Sea class, sailing to Bali, may learn about batiks as they create their own. Later, that class will learn about Gauguin's style as the ship sails through tropical seas. In that same lesson, they will use the knowledge they've gained as a jumping off point in making their own art.

One of the reasons Odyssey Art Centers work so well is that the program is so stimulating. A parent is excited that her bright five year old in our summer program can discuss the difference between the painting styles of Mary Cassat and Cezanne. And the young student has had great fun as well as painting in those styles. Learning should be and can be fun on all levels. Sure, it's a lot more work for the teacher. But we at Odyssey Art believe that learning should never stop. An older student is amazed that she has unlocked a certain creative aspect of herself that she didn't know existed.

 

STUDENT SNAPSHOT
By Nancy Armano
Endless variations of line, form, color, texture, and balance confront us in every waking moment of our lives. Yet we seldom consider what we are doing -- whether it be the way we comb out hair, select our clothes, or arrange the furniture in our house as a creative expression -- as a way in which we percieve ourselves and the world around us.

Art has taken on many forms of expression throughout my life -- whether it was in the design and construction of a home for my family, in the planning and preparation of an exotic meal intended to appeal both to the eye and palate or to assess the faded surroundings of another's home or office and then to infuse new life into that space. I truly take delight in exploring the ways we can observe and alter our visual world, but the most exciting and gratifying experience in art to date began in 1994 when I enrolled in Linda Perlmutter's adult watercolor class. Her extensive knowledge of the medium, extraordinary talent and unsurpassed skills as a teacher have provided me with the inspiration to permit my imagination to take flight, and to be expressed with a playfulness and a sense of adventure I never before experienced.

A year and a half ago I participated in the Odyssey Art at Sea training program. Last fall I had my first opportunity to employ the acrefully developed program. While crossing the Atlantic from New York to Southampton and cruising around spain and Portugal I witnessed something very special occurring among the passengers. Whether they had never picked up a paint brush or they had made a living as artists, they found enjoyment and satisfaction in the Odyssey Art at Sea class. Every student had a painting he or she was proud enough to exhibit at our art show. The captain marvelled at the high quality of each original.

Linda has refined a teaching method that enables us all to participate in painting having eliminated our fear of making mistakes -- there is none. We have the opportunity to explore and experience interpreting our world as we wish. What fun for us all. Thanks Linda!

 

THE MARS MILLENNIUM PROJECT
This project is a challenging and unique opportunity for America's youth to design a community on Mars by creating a visual representation of that community and then sharing it through the Mars 2030 Virtual Gallery. The designs will be registered and placed on a microchip for transfer to Mars on a future NASA mission. All Odyssey Art Centers will be involed ni this and will submit designs. Over 100 Organizations have joined to support Mars 2030. Among them are: the US Department of Education, NASA, the White House, Millennium Council, the National Educators Association and the National Endowment for the Arts. We're very excited about it!

 

ART HISTORY
On June 4th, Open Studios, a celebration of the opening of the Westchester Arts Council's new home took place. Linda Perlmutter's adult class participated in this exciting event. The building is located in the former Chase building at 31 Mamoroneck Avenue in White Plains.

 

ART QUIZ
What is the world's most expensive painting and how much did it cost?

The first ten winners get an Odyssey Art cap. E-mail us or write.

ART QUIZ & TRY THIS!
Try making a chance collage. Set a paper or board on the floor. Drop colored papers, cut or town into interesting shapes and glue where they land. You may discover some new and interesting possibilities!

 

ODYSSEY ON THE MOVE

The following Odyssey Art instructors
will be on the Queen Elizabeth II:
Linda Perlmutter   Aug 16-22
Zoe Mac   Aug 28-Sep 25
Carole Hickey   Sep 25-Oct 9
Sheila Berkley   Oct 21-Nov 2
Dorothy Calio   Nov 2-12

New Horizons
As of the year 2000 the Odyssey Art at Sea proram will be on board Crystal Cruises.
On Board Crystal Symphony World Cruise:
Marilyn Rees
Lost Angeles to Sydney
January 20 to February 25, 2000
Linda Perlmutter
Sydney to Singapore
February 25 to March 20, 2000
Maritza McCaskill
Singapore to Cape Town
March 20 to April 12, 2000
Zoe Mac
Cape Town to London
April 12 to May 4 2000

 

ART ON THE INTERNET
Some Unusual Art Sites
www.moma.org/artsafari
Visit MoMA's website for children where you'll discover wild animals in art by famous artists. You can also write your own stories and submit them to the Museum.
www.sanford-artedventures.com
Someone has changed history! You must travel back in time to the Renaissance and explore Leonardo's art and inventions and discover the spirit of the Renaissance while solving this interactive mystery.

 

ODYSSEY INTERACTIVE
The following comments are from notes Marilyn Rees recieved while she was teaching on board the Royal Viking Sun last December:
Your class was the high point of my crossing. Thank You. D.A., Downington, PA

Thank you for your wonderful class. L.F., England

Both my children loved your class. You are very helpful and good fun. Thanks for all your help. C. & P.M., Scotland.

It has been very enjoyable! If you are teaching in New York, please let me know. You are an inspiration. Thank you! B.L.A., New York, NY

Thank you so much! Wonderful! Wonderful! Wonderful! C.W., England

And these comments came to Odyssey via e-mail:
Greetings and a big thank you to Dorothy Calio for interesting and fun Art on the QE2 Mediterranean trip May 16-26. From a West Australian passenger.

I want to tell you how much I enjoyed Odyssey Art at Sea last November aboard the QE2. This is a "must repeat event" due to the excellent preparation, presentation and follow-through by Claire Ciancio. P.G.

 

WORTH A LOOK
At Katonah Museum of Art
WILDflowers Through October 3, 1999. The exhibition brings together work by contemporary artists who investigate flowers in their work. The genre has flourished throughout history: from ancient Roman wall paintings to 20th-century artists Georgia O'Keefe and Robert Mapplethorpe.

At MoMA
Different Roads: Automobiles for the Next Century Through September 21, 1999. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Sculpture Garden. Nine innovative automobiles designed to confront conditions facing the consumer and the automotive industry at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

At the Met
The Annenberg Collection of Impressionist and Postimpressionist Masterpieces Through November 7, 1999. One of the most distinguished private collections of its kind returns to public view.

Recent Acquisitions of Twentieth Century Design and Architecture Through November 14, 1999. Examples of post-1900 decorative arts including furniture, jewelry, glass, ceramis, textiles, drawings and other media.

At Hudson River Museum
Red Grooms, The Bookstore and the Late Seventies Through September 19, 1999. A celebration of the 20th anniversary of Red Grooms' Bookstore. The late seventies were frenetically productive times for hte internationally acclaimed Pop artist.

 

CONGRATULATIONS!
  • Sleepy Hollow High School gave flutist Denise Olsen, former Odyssey Art student a special recognition award.
  • Alison Lively, Odyssey Art student, Fleetwood Center, won an art award from Holy Child School in Rye, NY.
  • The national literary newspaper The High School Writer published work by Anabel Ibanez, a student at Sleepy Hollow High School and former Odyssey Art Student, Sleepy Hollow.
  • Jennifer Dondiego, Odyssey Art Student, Sleepy Hollow, and Rachel Kirschner, former Odyssey Art STudent, Sleepy Hollow, were winners in the Johns Hopkins Talent Search at the Morse School.
  • Russel Anello, former Odyssey Art Student, Sleepy Hollow, was a top scorer in the college entrance exam prep competition in math at Sleepy Hollow High School.
  • A mask created by Molly Jarr, former Odyssey Art Student, Sleepy Hollow, was selected for an Art Legacy Award at Maple Point School in Bucks County, PA.

Please let us know of other awards or items of interest!

 

CAN YOU BELIEVE?
Our last newsletter went to 22 foreign countries and 31 states.

DID YOU KNOW?
Training for adults and children is considered to be a top trend for the next millenium according to Successful Franchising.

THANK YOU. . .
to the following students for this issue's "Artifacts" illuminated letters: B.J. Lillis, Nicole London, Lily G. Schroedel, Catherine Lillis (available in the print version).
Also to: . . . Linda Mattera and Magi Wilson for typing the mailing labels.
. . . Seafarer Canvas for the wonderulf fabrics and foam.
. . . HG Caspari Inc, for Mary Cassat, Georgia O'Keefe and Auguste Renoir reproductions which each child will recieve in Odyssey Art classes this year.

WE LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU
email or write us at: P.O. Box 512 Tarrytown, NY 10591
e-mail: odysseyart@aol.com
Sleepy Hollow - 914-631-7148
Fleetwood - 914-669-3584
South Salem - 914-763-6244
Ossining (914) 923-1669
. . . It is not what you keep from a child that will save him, or what town you move him to. It is what you put into him in the first place.
-- THE NEW YORK TIMES EDITORIAL, APRIL 22, 1999.